Hakkaisan Week at Sake Bar Method in NYC: May 15-20, 2018


May 15-20th, 2018, come to dinner at Sake Bar METHOD in Hell’s Kitchen. We are offering a one week special on Hakkaisan 3 Year Snow-Aged Junmai Ginjo. This is an aged sake unlike any other you have tried! Matured in stainless steel for 3 years in our frosty snow storage cellar (Yuki Muro), you have to experience this sake!

Order this sake by the glass, carafe or bottle. Try it warm or cold. Customers who order a bottle of the Hakkaisan 3 Year Snow Aged Sake get a special gift from the brewery while supplies last!

Sake Bar Method: 746 10th ave. New York

https://kitchensakebarmethod.nyc/hours

Clear Sparkling AWA arrives in America!

Let’s celebrate Summer with Hakkaisan Clear Sparkling AWA!

Hakkaisan applied second fermentation in bottle method to create all natural, elegant and fine sparkling bubbles. Lightly sweeten and refreshing sparkling sake is perfect for summer party!

Aromas of fresh fruits with elegant sweetness of AWA pairs wonderfully with smoked salmon tartar with touch of anchovy, oil marinated oyster, or light pastry.

AWA means “bubbles” in Japanese, the line of bubbles look striking in the glass, enhancing any celebratory occasion.

Hakkaisan Clear Sparkling AWA will be available in the U.S. this JUNE!!

SPECIFICATION: Alcohol 13%, SMV -5, Acidity 1.4, Amino Acid 0.7, Milling Rate 50%,                  Rice  Yamadanishiki, Gohyakumangoku, Koshiibuki, and Miyamanishiki.

Kanpai

Hakkaisan Joins ASPEN Food and Wine Festival 2018

ASPEN Food and Wine Festival is the one of the largest and finest Food and Wine Festival in the U.S. This year, Hakkaisan will be joining the festival to introduce our fine line of Japanese Sake. I hope to see you at beautiful Aspen Mountain!

FOOD & WINE Announces Talent Line-Up and Event Schedule for the
36th annual FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, June 15 – 17, 2018
Headliners for the weekend include: Anne Burrell, Alex Guarnaschelli, Tyler
Florence, Stephanie Izard, Gabrielle Hamilton, Jacques and Claudine Pépin,
Marcus Samuelsson, Curtis Stone, and Andrew Zimmern
Weekend will celebrate 30th Anniversary of FOOD & WINE Best New Chefs and
Restaurants of the Year with Special Events

Premium OKAN Campaign

Every one knows “hot sake”. It is very hot, doesn’t taste good, but you can get a buzz. No body really likes it but its been the only choice for warm sake. In this winter, Hakkaisan Brewery will change your mind about “hot sake” forever! We offer our good quality premium sake serving warm in this cold winter. Warmed up sake is called “OKAN” in Japanese and it describes any temperature of warmth. We created this cute pop for restaurants through out NYC and L.A. to start with! You might think quality sake should drink cold, but warming it up will you bring whole new experiences. Keep yourselves warm with HAKKAISAN Premium OKAN this cold winter!

Here is the POP that we use to introduce OKAN culture.
Front:

Back:

KANPAI!

SAKE Lecture at Japan Society in New York City

February 7, 2018, our Brand Ambassador Timothy Sullivan gave lectures on Sake and experience of living in Sake Brewery for whole year at Japan Society in New York City.

Japan Society is the leading U.S. organization committed to deepening mutual understanding between the United States and Japan in a global context. Now in its second century, the Society serves audiences across the United States and abroad through innovative programs in arts and culture, public policy, business, language and education.

260 tickets were completely sold out way before the event day, and 80% of guests were non-Japanese which shows that the interests in SAKE has grown very much in New York City market.

After the lecture, Hakkaisan sake were served. Snow Aged 3 years Junmai Ginjo, Tokutesu Honjozo, and Junmai Ginjo were served. Most of the guests tried all three kinds and gathered around Timothy.

Hakkaisan x French Food Pairing Dinner in Hong Kong

October 27, 2017, Asian technique influenced French food and Hakkaisan Sake pairing dinner was served at La Table French Brasserie in New World Millennium Hong Kong Hotel. 40 guests were mesmerised by beautiful food pairing of french food and Hakkaisan sake. The chef was influenced by Jean-Georges’ broth oriented light and elegant french which beautifully paired with sophisticated and elegant Hakkaisan sake.

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6 courses of dinner were served with 5 Hakkaisan specially selected sake. Each dish perfectly matched with sake, no one was missing wine for entire dinner.

Menu
Amuse Bouche: Fresh Oyster – Gelee, pickled seaweed
Scallop Crudo – Siracha granita, finger line, rice cracker with Hakkaisan AWA Sparkling Sake
Sea Urchin Resotto – Sweet corn, black truffle with Hakkaisan Snow Aged 3 years Junmai Ginjo
Salmon – Cabbage, shiitake duxelle, salsify, dashi with Hakkaisan Kongoshin Junmai Daiginjo
Sirloin of Beef – Soya butter sauce, asparagus, chives with Hakkaian Tokubetsu Junmai
Yuzu Lemon Tart with Hakkaisan Kijoshu

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Fermentation Professional, Ms. Fujimoto attended this dinner, and her best matching was Sea Urchin Risotto paired with Snow Aged Junmai Ginjo 3-years. She said that Umami of sea urchin and sweetness of sweet corn with Snow Aged Junmai Ginjo’s concentrated Umami was absolutely beautiful pairing.

Our Managing Sales Director, Mr. Inoue spoke the honer of being the first Sake Maker to hold the food pairing dinner with French food at one of the best French restaurant in Hong Kong, as well as characteristics of each bottle of sake.
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A Plum Job: Making Umeboshi

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You’ve been eating it wrong! I said to myself. This was my a-ha moment regarding “Umeboshi” or Japanese pickled plums.

Umeboshi are a universal staple in Japan. These tiny preserved plums can be kept for years and are soft in texture yet very sour, salty yet with hints of sweetness. Its an unusual taste if you’re not prepared for it and my first time trying it years ago, I took a big a bite like I was eating, well, a regular plum. An overpowering sour taste filled my mouth. Needless to say, I wasn’t a fan. From that point on,I thought umeboshi were just another strange Japanese food to put on my “do not eat” list. Little did I know then, I would come to love these sour little plums.

My change of heart happened last fall at the Hakkaisan company cafeteria. One day, I looked over and saw my colleague use his chopsticks to nip of a small piece of the pickled plum and eat that tiny salty bit on top of a bite of white rice. I tried the same and it was a revelation. Eaten in small bites together with rice, Umeboshi is absolutely delicious. I asked about the plums and was told to my surprise that they were homemade! These Umeboshi we enjoy at the cafeteria are made every year by Mr. Tanaka, one of the managing brewers at Hakkaisan. I asked Tanaka-san to show me how they were made. I had to wait until this summer, but I finally got my chance to see how Umeboshi come to be. I did my best to document the process below.

Umeboshi of course must start with good ume. Japanese ume plums are a unique variety available widely in Japan but more rare overseas. They are quite small, about the size of a walnut and are harvested every year from mid to late June. Because of that, summer is umeboshi making season. Its important that the plums be picked when they are still firm and hard and still mostly green in color. Wakayama Prefecture is the most famous ume growing area in Japan.

ume-wash

The first step is to wash the ume carefully. Any ume that have bruises or ripped or damaged skin cannot be used to make umeboshi. The skins must be pristine. we carefully washed each ume and then with a small wooden pick, we removed any remaining stems being very careful not to pierce the skin. If there is any blemish on the ume, mold can grow there and ruin your whole batch.

Once the ume are washed, cleaned, stemmed, and carefully checked for bleminshes the next step is to layer them with salt. Here the plums are put into a food safe container with a plastic lining. The salt will do a few things. First, the salt will draw out moisture from the Ume. The salt content will also begin to preserve the ume and lastly, it will also inhibit the growth of any mold. Different Umeboshi recipes call for a different amounts of salt to ume ratio.

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Next the ume and salt mixture is sealed up with a weight on top. The weight is important to apply pressure that will help the salt to draw moisture out of the plums. Once the weight is on top, the container is sealed air tight to avoid contamination.

ume-seal up

After about 1 week, we carefully reopen the container. Here you can see the umeboshi are still greenish yellow in color, but now floating in liquid drawn out of the plums by the salt.

ume-brine

If you’ve eaten umeboshi before, you know they are most often reddish in color. where does this red come from? Well, it comes from our next ingredient: red shiso. You may be familiar with green shisho leaves served along with your sushi or sashimi. Red shiso is a relative of the green variety, but quite different in taste. As such, it is not eaten raw as much. Here is the red shiso as we receive it from the farmer. I have even seen red shiso growing wild out here in the Niigata countryside.

shiso

Red Shiso has a two tone leaf with a dark green top and a deep purple underside. To prepare the shiso for use, we must first remove all the leaves from the stems and wash them very thoroughly.

uemboshi-shiso-wash

After washing, we process the leaves in big bunches. We mix them with salt and press them between our hands, squeezing as hard as possible. Tenderizes the tough shiso and removes unwanted moisture as well. Slowly, the leaves soften up and get tender. We press them into ball shapes abou the size of a softball.

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When all the shisho leaves have been washed, salted and pressed, we spread them out in one thick layer on top of all the ume and ume liquid. The weight is set back on top and the container is again re-sealed air tight. These shiso leaves will give off a coloring to the ume and the liquid, turning them from yellow-green to a reddish color.

umeboshi-shiso

The Shisho and ume stay wrapped up for about one month. We next look to the weather forecast and try to find three days with warm temperatures and no rain. Buy this point it is early august and the rainy season in Japan is more or less over. To start the drying process, we strain all of the plums and strands of shiso from the liquid. The brining liquid is now a dark purple and we reserve this liquid. The ume and shiso are separated and carefully laid out on bamboo baskets to air dry outside in the sun.

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For three days the Ume are dried and turned by hand every few hours. this ensures that the plums dry evenly. Sometimes the ume skin will stick to the basket and rip. if this happens, we put these ume to the side to eat immedately, they cannot be further preserved with torn skin.

ume-drying

After 3 days of drying in the sun, the ume and shiso are returned to the liquid to soften further and turn an even deeper red. From this point on the ume are officially “umeboshi”, but further aging gives them a deeper flavor. As I mentioned above umeboshi are best eaten in small nibbles with white rice. A paste can also be made from Umeboshi and is served alongside everything from chicken skewers to cucumber.

drying ume

The Umeboshi is a classic japanese food. If you haven’t tried it yet, please do. Homemade is best and don’t be like me… please learn to eat it the right way!

umeboshi-final

Hanabi – Japan’s “Flowers of Fire”

As soon as the weather got warm, I suddenly noticed “Fireworks” were everywhere. Soda cans, snack wrappers, store signage galore was decorated with limited summer Fireworks design. Also, lots of TV commercials began to feature fireworks, too. Fireworks are THE symbol of summer in Japan.

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As a 4th of July-loving American, i’ve seen fireworks almost every year of my life. As so often in Japan, I thought I knew all there was to about fireworks… and then I experienced my first Japanese fireworks festival. Fireworks are called “hanabi” in Japanese and it literally means Flower of Fire. Think of them as a bouquet in the sky…. made of fire! If you look at it that way, who wouldn’t get excited?

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I attended the Nagaoka City summer fireworks festival, billed as one of top 3 in Japan. I heard it was big, but I wasn’t quite prepared for how big. I learned after the fact that the night I was there, there were about 400,000 spectators watching the show! Walking from the station to the event grounds was a giant flow of humanity. Many people were wearing festive yukata summer kimono. The fireworks festival is one of the biggest events of the year for Nagaoka and the nagaoka train station has displays dedicated to fireworks, too.

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There were some differences between this fireworks show and ones we have in the U.S. Usually in the States, once the fireworks start, they run nonstop until the end. The Nagaoka fireworks had an MC over loudspeaker making an announcement each few minutes announcing a sponsor for each display. There was a lot of stopping and starting but each mini fireworks show has its own personality and theme. One even featured a Hello Kitty face in Fireworks!

However the highlight was known as the “Phoenix” display. This is recognized as the widest fireworks display in the world with the launch pads spread out over a mile in length. This display was conceived as a symbol of rebirth and recovery following a deadly 2004 earthquake that struck this area of Niigata. It was an impressive display – one of those beautiful fleeting scenes you try to take in as best you can. Pictures and videos don’t do it justice.

If you’re interested in Fireworks be sure to put the Nakaoka summer display on your bucket list!

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Hakkaisan at Ginza Six!

I think it is fair to say there is no shortage of places to go shopping in Tokyo. You can drop big bucks on electronics in the Akihabara district or shop for cutting edge, mismatched outfits in Harajuku. However the epicenter of serious retail therapy is without a doubt in Ginza. The Ginza district is famous the world over for high end boutiques, Towering department stores, and an endless parade of Ladies Who Lunch.

The latest addition to Ginza’s retail arena is known as Ginza Six which opened to much fanfare in April 2017. If the rest of Ginza is cool, Ginza Six was built to impress even more. With 421 stores in over 500,000 square feet of space, Ginza Six is one of the biggest shopping complexes in Ginza. Entering, you’ll see the central atrium outfitted with a stunning polka dot sculpture designed by arguably Japan’s most famous living artist, Yayoi Kusama.

Ginza Six Atrium

Ginza Six Atrium

Almost Every Japanese department store has an over-the-top food court on the basement level, this is known as a “depachika” (a mix of “depato“, which means department store, and “chika“, which means basement). Most visitors to Japan will easily remember their first visit to a depatchika as the vast selection and stunning presentation of foods is hard to forget. Ginza Six also has a basement food floor on the B2 level, but they really kick it up a notch.

My recent visit to Ginza Six was to check out their basement food floor to enjoy Hakkaisan’s new Ginza Sennenkoujiya shop.

Hakkaisan's Ginza Sennen Koujiya.

Hakkaisan’s Ginza Sennen Koujiya.

Sennen Koujiya is Hakkaisan’s retail shop that sells all of the Hakkaisan sake, but also food and other fermented items from Niigata. The Ginza Six branch is the latest to open.

I visited for the first time on a rainy Saturday. My first impression of Ginza Six was how popular it was. Shoppers were everywhere, even on a rainy day. Lots of people are curious about this new shopping complex and it seemed that every shop was busy. I headed down to the B2 level and took a look around for Sennen Koujiya.

Lots of Hakkaisan Sake for sale at Sennen Koujiya

Lots of Hakkaisan Sake for sale at Sennen Koujiya

Hakkaisan Ginjo Funaguchi

Hakkaisan Ginjo Funaguchi

The shop has a beautiful open wood panel design. Along the left wall, there is a full range of Hakkaisan Sakes, but the refrigerator in the corner contained something special. This shops sells some limited sake that is not for sale anywhere else! These include rare Hakkaisan ‘Funaguchi sakes’ – that is sakes right from the sake press! Fully unpasteurized and non-charcoal filtered. Each bottle is labeled by hand.

Another rare sake that you can only find at Ginza Six is Hakkaisan Ultra Premium Kouwagura 25% Junmai Daiginjo. This is an outstanding sake that has the rice milled to 25% remaining and is aged for 2 years at 0˚C. Super rare and delicious!

Hakkaisan Fermentation goods including Amasake.

Hakkaisan Fermentation goods including Amasake.

The back wall of the shop contains space for all of the perishable fermentation goods including Amazake (a sweet, no alcohol koji rice drink), as well as koji, shio koji as well as koji marinated meats and veggies.

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Along the right side wall is a small tasting counter. Guests can order a limited menu of bites and small appetizers and a sake pairing. I was excited to try, and I was able to enjoy a unique and wonderful pairing! I tried the Snow Aged Junmai Ginjo 3 Years served in a beautiful antique glass along with the recommended pairing of Fukinoto (spring mountain vegetable) Miso paste along with sour cream and a drip of lemon. It was a beautiful savory and rich pairing with the Snow aged Junmai Ginjo.

Tasting bar and Ginza Sennen Koujiya.

Tasting bar and Ginza Sennen Koujiya.

If you get a chance to visit Tokyo, don’t miss the chance to stop into Ginza Six! A delicious sake and snack is waiting for you at Sennen Koujiya. Pick up some sakes and niigata foods while you are there. You’re friends back home will have depatchika envy!

Ginza Six is popular even in the rain!

Ginza Six is popular even in the rain!