NYC: A Sushi Connoisseur’s Dinner featuring Hakkaisan

On March 27, 2012, by Timothy Sullivan

Learn to Appreciate Authentic Sushi with Sushi Authority Trevor Corson at Jewel Bako

Think tuna toro is the ultimate traditional sushi? Think again–truly serious sushi connoisseurs in Japan think toro is for amateurs. Ditto for many of the types of so-called Japanese sushi that we thoughtlessly consume every day. The sushi that most of us are eating in the West bears little resemblance to real Japanese sushi, and has none of the delicacy, variety and sophistication of this age-old Japanese culinary art. Yet most of us don’t realize what we’re missing.

Trevor Corson, the author of The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw Fish and Rice and one of the leading authorities on the history, techniques and etiquette of sushi outside Japan, will guide us through a traditional Edo-period meal that Japanese gourmands would have eaten over a century ago. Traditional Edo-mae sushi provides the basis for contemporary gourmet sushi served at the most highly-regarded sushi restaurants in Tokyo, including Sukiyabashi Jiro featured in the new documentary film Jiro Dreams of Sushi. Because this style of sushi is so different, Trevor will explain all the whys and hows of appreciating the food and soliciting a similar experience from a chef again.

Backing up Trevor’s approach is deep first-hand knowledge. He lived in Japan for three years and spent a year reading Japanese-language sources on sushi and talking with Japanese chefs for his highly acclaimed book. Trevor loves to share his passion and excitement for authentic Japanese sushi. His guided tastings of real sushi reveal that even the sushi bars in the U.S. that are believed to be authentic aren’t necessarily so traditional, either. What’s worse, much American-style sushi was invented to unload low-quality ingredients on unsuspecting customers.

Trevor has been working closely with the Japanese master chef at Jewel Bako for several years to serve historical sushi menus that revive the culinary values of the past. The dinner will be accompanied with premium Hakkaisan sake chosen by a certified sake sommelier who can also tell you about how fine Hakkaisan sake can enhance the umami in the sushi dishes.

Over and over again, Trevor hears from his guests at the end of the evening: “Now I never want to go back to the sushi I was eating before.”

Event Details

Date: April 12th
Time: 7:00 to 9:00 PM

Jewel Bako
239 East 5th Street #2
between Second and Third Avenues
East Village
(212) 979 – 1012

Guided historical sushi menu
appetizer
10-12 pieces of sushi
soup
dessert
premium sake

$130

Limited to 18 seats.

 

Leave a Reply